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(Note: We write this with all sensitivity to those who have lost love ones this year, and with our own memories of those we have lost both from COVID and other reasons.)

I grew up in the farm country outside Wichita, Kansas. I told someone that one time, and he replied “I know the place. I spent a decade there one year.”

While I actually loved growing up where I did, and am grateful for my midwest roots, it’s a funny joke.

But that’s how I feel about 2020. We spent a decade in that year.

In a truly unbelievable year for the world, it was also a remarkable year for both investors and for how many people look at personal finance. …


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In the real world, the turning of the calendar can be a busy time financially with the holidays, year-end bonuses, tax deadlines, etc. so it makes for a good time to share financial lessons with our kids too.

While many New Year Resolution diets, exercise routines, and other versions of “This time it’s different” will be distant memories by Groundhog Day, here’s some things you can do with your kids to teach lessons that will last a lifetime.

Strong personal finance habits and knowledge can play a considerable role in the quality of your life, therefore, it is important to help our kids develop these skills before we release them to the world. …


Thanksgiving officially kicks off the holiday season, even if some people have had their lights up since November 1st.

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The “busy-ness” of prepping for Thanksgiving can be a perfect time to sneak some lessons to your kids.

Here are some ways you can teach your kids about money and the stock market during the Thanksgiving holiday.

Put the “Give” into Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving is the perfect time to talk about family values around giving.

Does your family donate money to any charities or non-profits throughout the year?

Do your kids have any charities or non-profits that might be close to their hearts? …


A good way to introduce your kids to the idea of the stock market is by talking about the businesses they see in their everyday life.

If we’re preparing our kids for the real world, we owe it to them to teach them how to handle and understand money, and also to be aware of the basics of business. If done well, you can use the conversation about money to springboard your kids towards even larger lessons about stocks.

You see, business is happening all around you, and pointing it out to your kids can pay dividends in the long run (literally). …


For new investors, the different “order types” when buying or selling stocks can be confusing. This post will break some of the basics.

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Market Order

The “Market Order” is the simplest type of order. When you enter a market order, you are instructing your broker to buy or sell the stock at the next available price, from or to the next available investor.

You have given no instructions for what price you are willing to pay or take for the transaction, only that you want it done immediately to or from the next willing party.

Limit Order

A “Limit Order” sets a price for what you are willing to pay if you are buying, or receive if you are selling. For example, if you are only willing to pay $20 for a certain stock, but nothing more than $20, you would set a Buy Limit for the stock at $20. Your order will only execute if the price is $20 or below. …


Anyone can pick a stock. A monkey with a newspaper and a dartboard can pick a stock, or so I’ve been told. The goal is to buy stocks that will go UP in price. Easier said than done or everyone would do it.

There are a million or so reasons that influence a stock’s price over the short and long-term. On a day-to -day basis, the biggest influence on a stock’s price movement is generally the overall market of ALL stocks. In the short-term — most stocks move together.

Over days, weeks, months and years you see these returns develop their own independent patterns — some winners, some losers. …


Good investors are like farmers. They plant seeds into assets that they hope will grow and pay back more than the cost of the seed and overhead.

Good teachers are the same way. They plant seeds of knowledge in their students that when cultivated, can change the course of a person’s life.

Just like farming, both teaching and investing can be stressful endeavors. In 2008- 2009, the global stock market was suffering a historical decline due to the “Global Financial Crisis”.

In the midst of this chaos, two Chicago investment professionals, Charlie Bobrinskoy and Jim Hoeg, took it upon themselves to start something truly wonderful. …


I love to talk about stocks and the stock market. It’s fun to learn about new companies and new innovations. But the stock market can also be a very dangerous place for money. It’s FAR easier to lose money than make money if you don’t know what you are doing.

Even if you know what you are doing, there are things you should to do to prepare yourself before you start buying stocks or investing. First, you need to have a plan for what you are trying to accomplish, and you need to take care of some basic financial fundamentals. Think about your financial goals for your life and seek to develop a comprehensive financial plan to guide you to them. …


“Compound Interest is The Most Powerful Force in The Universe.” Albert Einstein

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Albert Einstein: Financial Advisor

This famous quote from Albert Einstein speaks to the significance of compound interest as a financial concept. Those are strong words from someone who most people consider a credible source on math-type stuff.

Once you understand what compound interest means, it can change your perspective on money and investing.

Even with all that fanfare for the topic, I’ve been guilty of neglecting to properly cover when discussing financial literacy. I’ve found I take for granted that I was taught the power behind compound interest at a young age. …


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We’ve all heard and maybe even been guilty of using the phrase “kids are like sponges”, but is this a true statement? In my experience, “kids are like sponges… …for about 30 seconds”. I am not a professional teacher, but I am an amateur parent, and I’ve found that if you want to teach something to kids, it needs to be fun and quick. By the way, most grown-ups are the same way, but that’s another conversation.

I have managed to trick my kids into learning more about the stock market than they realize with simple conversations about business and companies, as well as easy but fun activities like The Annual Stock Market Game. …

About

J. J. Wenrich CFP

Author, Speaker, Financial Literacy Advocate | Founder of TeachingKidsToBuyStocks.com.

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